Wonderful Story, Thanks Whitewolfpack!

From:  http://www.whitewolfpack.com/2014/07/heroic-pit-bull-saves-deaf-boy-from.html?showComment=1405682028244#c1564072031171231199

Heroic Pit Bull saves deaf boy from house fire (VIDEO)

 

Ace the Pit Bull is being hailed as a hero after he alerted a sleeping deaf boy that the house was on fire.

Thirteen-year-old Nick Lamb was at home alone and was sleeping when Ace jumped on his bed.

“My dog licked my face and woke me up,” Nick told WISH-TV Indianapolis. “I was like, ‘Stop it! What? You want to be fed?’ I thought he wanted to be fed or go outside.”

But Ace wouldn’t stop licking Nick and that’s when he noticed the house was full of smoke.

“I couldn’t hear anything because I had my cochlear implants off. … My dog Ace smelled it,” said Nick. Nick grabbed one of his implants and without any shoes he went downstairs with Ace. Nick and Ace navigated to the back door through the smoke and fire.

The blaze destroyed the family’s home, but firefighters were able to rescue the cat stuck inside. The family home was a total loss, but the family is incredibly grateful that Ace saved Nick’s life.
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Responses to “Heroic Pit Bull saves deaf boy from house fire (VIDEO)”

  1. nootkabear says:

    Pits have proven to be great search and rescue animals. The people being rescued, are usually scared to death when they see the Pit, but the animal did wonderful job, and the people should just get over their fears. Pits have had a bad rap!

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How To Blackout Your Site (For SOPA/PIPA) Without Hurting SEO

 

How To Blackout Your Site (For SOPA/PIPA) Without Hurting SEO

Jan 16, 2012 at 2:39pm ET by Matt McGee

Google-Webmaster-SEO-Rep-1304428070A number of websites are (or were) planning to “go black” this week while the U.S. Congress discusses issues related to the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP Act (PIPA). The website blackouts are part of a larger social media effort against the bills that our Greg Finn wrote about this morning on Marketing Land.

You may be thinking about joining the website blackout movement, but yikes … what about the SEO implications? How do you take your site offline in protest without messing up your visibility in Google’s search results?

Well, Google’s Pierre Far shared several tips earlier today on Google+ in a post called “Website outages and blackouts the right way.”

In short, the advice is to use a 503 HTTP status code to tell spiders that the website is temporary unavilable. With a 503 status, Google won’t index the content (or lack thereof if you’re blacking out your site) and it won’t consider the site as having duplicate content issues (when all of the pages are blacked out).

But Far adds a couple important caveats to this advice regarding the robots.txt file and what will happen in Webmaster Tools if Google finds your site blacked out. Another Googler, John Mueller, adds additional information in the comments, so you’ll want to read the original Google+ post if you’re thinking about blacking out your website this week for SOPA, or in the future for any other reason.

Of course, also keep in mind that Bing may not handle things the same way if you do blackout your site.

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Related Topics: Google: SEO | SEO: Blocking Spiders | SEO: Duplicate Content


About The Author: Matt McGee is Search Engine Land’s Executive News Editor, responsible for overseeing our daily news coverage. His news career includes time spent in TV, radio, and print journalism. His web career continues to include a small number of SEO and social media consulting clients, as well as regular speaking engagements at marketing events around the U.S. He blogs at Small Business Search Marketing and can be found on Twitter at @MattMcGee and/or on Google Plus. See more articles by Matt McGee

How To Blackout Your Site (For SOPA/PIPA) Without Hurting SEO

Wikipedia Will Go Dark On January 18 To Protest SOPA And PIPA | TechCrunch

 

Wikipedia Will Go Dark On January 18 To Protest SOPA And PIPA

ChrisVelazco

posted 7 hours ago

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Chris Velazco is a mobile enthusiast and writer who studied English and Marketing at Rutgers University. Once upon a time, he was the news intern for MobileCrunch, and in between posts, he worked in wireless sales at Best Buy. After graduating, he returned to the new TechCrunch to as a full-time mobile writer. He counts advertising, running, musical theater,… → Learn More

Wikipedia_SOPA_Blackout_Design

Wikipedia_SOPA_Blackout_Design

Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales wanted to send a “big message” to the U.S. government regarding the two heinous internet censorship bills currently being considered, and after a brief period of debate the world’s encyclopedia will soon do just that.

The Wikipedia founder announced on Twitter today that starting at midnight on Wednesday, January 18, the English language version of the world’s encyclopedia will go dark for 24 hours in protest of SOPA and PIPA. With their commitment confirmed, Wikipedia will be joining a slew of websites and companies that will suspend their operations for one day in an effort raise awareness around the two bills.

Meant to curb IP theft and piracy, the (imaginatively named) Stop Online Piracy Act and the PROTECT IP Act have raised eyebrows recently due to their decidedly scorched-earth approach to handling suspected offenders. Websites found to offer pirated content, along with the services that they use, could be hidden from US internet users by being delisted on search engines and potentially on DNS servers themselves.

Rather than let users access Wikipedia’s vast stores of English-language information on the 18th, Wales mentioned that the Wikipedia landing page will instead be populated with a letter of protest and a call to action that urges readers to get involved with the issue. It doesn’t appear as though the new landing page has been finalized, but one of the community’s prototypes can be seen above.

The news comes after a lengthy debate as to the particulars of such a grand gesture — whether or not the site should participate at all, which versions of the site would be affected, and how exactly the blackout would go down were all on the table for the community to discuss. Ultimately, the consensus pointed to a full blackout as a the proper way to make their collective displeasure known. There’s no official word on how other parts of the site will handle the event, although Wales has mentioned that the German language version of the site will be displaying a banner in support.

Meanwhile, some of SOPA’s supporters are already reacting to the very public backlash against the bill. Ars Technica reports that Congressman Lamar Smith (R-TX) would be pulling his DNS-blocking provisions from the bill after having consulted with “industry groups across the country.” What’s more, the White House has responded to two petitions about SOPA and PIPA on the official White House blog stating that they will not “support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet.”

Wales notes on Twitter that while SOPA has been “crippled,” buts its counterpart in the Senate is still very much alive and very dangerous. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid recently popped up on Meet The Press claiming his continued support for PIPA even though it “could create some problems.”

Though the event is meant to raise public awareness over two critical pieces of legislation, Wales still took a moment to offer a bit of sage advice for students heading back to school:

Jimmy Wales@jimmy_wales

Student warning! Do your homework early. Wikipedia protesting bad law on Wednesday! #sopa

16 Jan 12

Tags: Wikipedia, sopa, PIPA

Wikipedia Will Go Dark On January 18 To Protest SOPA And PIPA | TechCrunch